Preserving the Harvest

The last week has been cool and rainy, rainy, rainy, rainy.  I was lucky to have my sister home from Guelph on the weekend, and we decided to get some canning done.  It’s been a while since I’ve been in the garden – Jae has taken to the gardening while I lay in bed with some rotten pregnancy sickness – so I wasn’t quite prepared for what I saw when sister and I went out to harvest tomatoes for canning.

Endless rainy days destroyed a LOT of my lovely heirloom tomatoes.  Many hadn’t ripened in the cool, sun-less weather, but those that had ripened too fast, split, and fell to the ground to rot. I had planned on making salsa verde with tomatillos, but the dreary weather meant that none of those sweet little fruits were ripened, either.

Still, we ended up with enough good tomatoes to make a batch of salsa.  We used all the good tomatoes we were able to find, ending up with about 6lbs after seeding and stemming. Not too bad.  I borrowed the basics from the book “Put ‘Em Up!“, but changed the recipe a little to suit my tastes.  Here’s what we did:

~~*~~

Heirloom Tomato Salsa

Ingredients:

1 Cup fresh-squeezed lime juice
Splash of vinegar
1/4 Cup organic cane sugar
1 Tbsp salt
4 lbs heirloom tomatoes, seeded and diced
3/4 lbs onions, diced
2 hot peppers, finely diced
1 cup chopped cilantro

Directions:

Bring the lime juice, splash of vinegar, sugar and salt to a boil.  Add the tomatoes, onions and hot peppers.  Return to a boil for about five minutes.  Add the cilantro and remove from the heat.

Ladle into clean, hot canning jars, leaving 1/2″ headspace.  Release trapped air, wipe rims clean, add lids.  Process in boiling water bath for 15 mins.  Turn off heat, remove canner lid, let jars rest in water for 5 mins.  Remove jars, set aside for 24 hrs, check seals. Keep for up to one year.

~~*~~

Our salsa was almost entirely local.  The only ingredients that weren’t locally sourced were the lime juice, sugar and salt.  The tomatoes and hot peppers were straight from our garden, picked that morning.  The onions were from a neighbouring farm (ours did poorly this year, unfortunately).  The cilantro was from my friend Lesley’s organic farm about 20 mins away. The vinegar was from our local Heinz factory (hey, that’s gotta count for something!).

My sister and I couldn’t resist – we had to eat some of the salsa fresh out of the pot.  There were no tortilla chips to be found in my cupboards, so we dipped pita bread instead.  The salsa was absolutely delicious! Amazing! The best salsa I’ve had yet.  I’m pretty thrilled to have plenty stored away to enjoy this winter.

Since I wasn’t able to do the salsa verde I had planned, I moved onto another project instead: wild grape jelly.  Again, I used a recipe from the book “Put ‘Em Up!”.  We had about 8lbs of wild grapes that Jae harvested on a recent foraging excursion.  I boiled them down, crushed them, and strained the juice through cheesecloth overnight.  The next morning, I boiled the juice with sugar and pectin, as per the recipe directions, and canned it.  Twenty-four hours later, I checked to see if it had set… and, it hadn’t.  I’m not sure what went wrong there, but I now have 8 jars of grape juice, NOT grape jelly.  I’m going to have to do some searching on the webz to find a solution.  Perhaps I can pop those jars open and use that juice to try again?  Or is that a no-no?  I have some learning to do…

It looks like we might have some clear days ahead of us, so I have my fingers crossed that my tomatillos will ripen, the last of the tomatoes will turn red, and I can get some more canning done.  We also have to pay a visit to my in-laws (about 15-mins away) to harvest the fruit hanging on their apple and pear trees.

There’s nothing more satisfying than opening the cupboards to see rows of homegrown food preserved for the winter!

 

(I wish I had photos of our lovely canning day and jars full of goodness to share with you, dear readers, but alas! My camera is lost and so is my cell phone.  Photos will have to wait for another day…)

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2 thoughts on “Preserving the Harvest

  1. Sorry to hear you’ve been feeling ill! :(

    Last year I made a batch of grape jelly that didn’t set at all, either. What I did was, as I opened each jar I boiled the contents really well (like for about 5 minutes) and then put it back in the jar. This did set it well enough to use it for sandwiches, although it was still a bit runny. I’m not sure what went wrong, either–maybe it’s just a thing with grape juice?

  2. Sugar in salsa?!

    I made some yummy peach salsa this year and some regular stuff too. I’d love to get some tomatillo seeds for next year ;)
    I’m finding canning a long slow process – days of standing at the counter peeling and seeding tomatoes and so often it seems to yield so little. But the results cannot be compared. The tastes are so much better than store bought stuff. Knowing what is in the jar and that it is all toxin free makes it delightful to serve to the family and of course saving the expense of buying lesser quality food is always a bonus!!

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